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Dick and balls

Your meat and veg, your twig and berries, your trouser snake and plums.

Whatever you call them, your dick and balls provide an endless source of entertainment – but they are also highly vulnerable to infections and virus.

Find out how look after your blue veined custard chucker and chicken nuggets before, during and after sex.

Dicking around

Your dick is a sensitive part of the body, but it’s also one of the most vulnerable when it comes to HIV and STIs. It’s the moist lining inside the dick eye (the little hole at the end) and under your foreskin (if you’re uncut) that allows HIV to enter your body.

HIV thrives inside the butt and there is more HIV in the mucus of the moist ass lining than in blood or cum. This is why protection is important, especially for anal sex.

Taking PrEP or maintaining an undetectable viral load can greatly reduce the chance of HIV transmission

You can either put a condom on, or you can take PrEP to protect you and your dick! 

When you’re fucking someone with a condom on, pull out your cock occasionally (such as when you change positions) and check the condom is still in place. For extended sessions, you can put a new condom on when you’re reapplying lube. If condom is not your thing, consider taking PrEP to protect yourself. PrEP is great for preventing HIV transmission, but it doesn't protect you from other STIs, such as syphilis, gonorrhea, or chlamydia.  

Keeping your dick clean – especially if you’ve got a foreskin – is vital as it reduces the chance of general infection (and increases your chances of getting a blowjob!). Gentle washing in the shower or bath is fine, but avoid over-washing as this can lead to skin problems.

Because you're worth it

To ensure your dick and balls are in tip-top condition, it’s a good idea to do monthly testicular self-examinations.

Early detection often means effective treatment for conditions such as testicular cancer. You’ll find that one hangs a bit lower than the other and is also slightly larger. That’s normal.

  • Gently roll each of your balls between your fingers and thumb. You’ll feel the long tube at the top and back of the testicle as a bump. Otherwise, it should feel smooth.
  • Compare the feel of one with the other, as it’s very unlikely both would show signs of cancer at the same time.

What you are checking for is change – has one of your balls grown larger, become heavier or even changed shape? If you find anything you’re not sure of, consult a doctor.

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