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Spit or Swallow?

So sucking dick is pretty awesome, but there comes a point in every blowjob where the decision must be made to spit or swallow, that is if you want to have your partner cum in your mouth.

Now blowjobs are not a high risk activity when it comes to HIV transmission because the lining of the mouth is strong and saliva also contains protective properties. It’s pretty hard to infect the skin inside your mouth. If your partner comes in your mouth it does increase the risk of getting HIV, as HIV is in a person's cum if they are someone who is living with HIV. However, if the person who is living with HIV maintains an undetectable viral load for at least six months, the virus cannot be passed on sexually. 

From a health perspective it doesn’t really matter too much if you spit or swallow, because it’s the length of time the cum is in your mouth that’s the risky part.

Having a healthy mouth reduces the risk of getting HIV. Bleeding gums, mouth ulcers, and throat infections make it easier for HIV and STIs to be transmitted. Flossing or vigorous brushing is better after the big date – not before – because it can break the skin on the gums, and who knows, you might get lucky! For fresh breath try chewing gum, mints or alcohol free mouthwash instead.

Men who have lots of oral sex with multiple partners should get regular check-ups for STIs like gonorrhoea, Chlamydia and syphilis every 3 to 6 months. You can also be exposed to Hepatitis B from infected cum, so vaccination is a good idea if you’re sexually active – Twinrix is the best choice because it protects against Hepatitis A and B.

Don't forget to have a poke around the website for more great information, and to check out this week's video blog on this topic hit play below!

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